Thursday, August 25, 2011

An Interview with Lucinda Moebius




I had an opportunity to get to know Lucinda Moebius a little bit, and here are some answers she’s provided so you can get to know her, too.  Go ahead and take a look at her website at www.lucindamoebius.com; and at the risk of spoiling the review, pick up Echos of Savanna.  You’ll probably like it.
Where are you from and what do you love most about your hometown?
Currently, I reside in Boise ID.  I grew up in Idaho and Eastern Oregon and although I have lived or visited many other places, I consider Boise my home.  I love the city; it has everything I need to be happy.  My family, except my father and one brother, all live in the same twenty-mile radius.  We are all exceedingly close, some may even say slightly co-dependent, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.  We have been there for each other for our life’s major events: marriages, births, baptisms, illness.  Boise is big enough to offer big city options like nightlife hotspots, fine dining, fast food and shopping yet small enough to safely raise a family and have neighborhood block parties.  It’s the place I will always call home.

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up? How has that childhood dream affected your career?

Even since I could remember I wanted to be a teacher.  I love the idea of working with children and teaching them something that will stay with them forever.  There is an almost magical feeling when a student gets a concept and has that Ah Ha moment.  It is like a light bulb goes off and their eyes light up.  I teach high school and college in addition to writing novels.  My students always ask me if I get rich from my writing would I give up teaching and I tell them no.  One of the reasons I write is to demonstrate
literary elements.  Even if I don’t teach in a traditional classroom I will always be a teacher.

Tell us about your latest book.  Do you have anything new in the works and can you tell us a bit about it?

My first book Echoes of Savanna is a Science Fiction novel set in the year 2036.  Savanna Taylor is a medical doctor who is dealing with genetically altered diseases released by terrorists.  More importantly, the novel’s concept is based on Campbell’s Hero’s Journey.  The story covers a generation, twenty years, of the main character’s life.  There are many events that happen to a person in the course of a lifetime.  Savanna is living in a time of fear and terror and her goal is to make a safe Haven for her family.

Echoes of Savanna is the first book in a series subtitled “The Haven Series”.  I have planned five novels in the series, each one covering twenty years of the main characters life.  I am nearly finished with Raven’s Song, the second book in the Haven Series novels.  Raven is Savanna’s daughter.  She is the polar opposite of Savanna.  Where Savanna is logical and cerebral, Raven is impulsive and a little on the wild side.  I really love Raven, she reminds me of so many of the strong women in my life. 

What prompted you to write this book?

The concept for this book actually grew from a concept developed in a creative writing class.  My students and I were discussing literature and writing together.  I had the idea for a genetically altered doctor who was fighting genetically altered diseases and the story started to flow.  I have always been a fan of Greek Mythology and the concept of the Hero’s Journey developing from this story felt very organic.  The story just seemed to flow out of me and it just grew into this amazing life.  Savanna is my child.  She is a beautiful creation and I would be doing her an injustice if I didn’t tell her story.

How did you come up with the title?

The point of view of the story is third person limited and I wanted to include the character’s name in the title.  As I wrote I noticed I was using the word echo to describe many elements in the story and the title became very organic at that point.  Echoes of Savanna just seems to flow off the tongue and I love the feel it has when I hear it.

What inspired you to be a writer?

My family is my inspiration.  We are a family of readers and books have been a part of my life since I was a baby.  My mother taught me to read before I was four years old and books have been my constant companion.  My Grandmother wrote poetry and she encouraged everyone in the family to write.  I love to read and I believe the stories I tell come from an extension of my love for literature.  There is something magical in being lost in a story and living your life in the characters.  I hope I can give my readers the same feeling.

Who is your favorite character in your books? Why?

Why don’t you ask me to pick my favorite child?  I just can’t do it.  Each character serves a purpose as either the main character or to support the main character and his/her growth as a person.  One of my favorite aspects of these novels is I am introducing a number of supporting characters who all have an entire story that can’t be told since the novel is written in third person limited.  I want to share the experience of writing with my fans.  I intend to write a core of five novels and invite my fans to pick their favorite character and submit story ideas and write their own novels in the Haven Series.  The information and guidelines for this concept can be found on my website.

Is there anything you find particularly challenging about writing?

The only thing I really find challenging about writing is my severe lack of time.  In addition to teaching I help my husband with his business, spend time with my family, work on promoting my books and try to fit in writing.  It makes many late nights.

What advice would you give to writers just starting out?

Just write.  Love what you are doing and take a break when you can.  One of the things I learned while editing Echoes was I needed to take a break between editing sessions and the book suffered for it.  Take a step back and put your writing on the shelf for a week or two.

Do you ever suffer from writer's block? If so, what do you do about it?

I think everyone suffers from writer’s block.  If I try to force the story when I am blocked nothing happens.  When the ideas don’t come I do all sorts of things to get my mind off writing.  I take a walk, eat a snack, play a game, read a book, spend time with my husband, play on the internet.  I do anything but think about writing.  Once I purge my mind of the block the ideas seem to flow and I can get back to the story.  Usually my inspiration occurs between two and four in the morning.

Who is your favorite author and why? What books have most influenced your life?

Again, this goes back to picking my favorite child; it’s impossible.  I get as much joy from reading classics from Homer, Shakespeare, the Bronte sisters, Harper Lee as I do contemporary authors such as Elizabeth Moon, David Eddings, Jean Auel, Terry Brooks and many others.  My favorite genre is Fantasy with Science Fiction coming in a close second.  I am not exclusive, as you can see from my authors’ list, I read anything I can get my hands on.  Of course, the book that has had the greatest influence in my life is the Bible.  I would love to teach the Bible as literature class. 

How did you deal with rejection letters?

Well, I’ve never had a rejection letter.  The first publisher I submitted my work to accepted it.  Aaron Patterson is an indie publisher and so he has a little leeway when accepting and rejecting authors.  I was at the right place at the right time and was blessed to find a publisher who accepted my work right away.  I guess I just don’t have the starving artist, rejection letter after rejection letter story to tell.  I’m sorry to disappoint.

What's the weirdest thing you've ever done in the name of research?

I didn’t really do anything weird per se, but I have experienced a lot of weird thing in my life.  When I was young my family and I lived in a cabin in the Idaho mountains for a year and a half .  The cabin did not have running water, electricity and had an outhouse for a bathroom.  Needless to say that experience influenced me and my writing immensely.

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